The Identity Of The FHWA Inside Our Lives

Many of us encounter construction workers in their bright orange vests or the <a href="http://www.squidoo.com/safety-green-t-shirts" target='_blank'>safety green tshirt</a>. These garments are designed to keep the workers safe, and they are required to be worn and meet special criteria by the FHWA, the Federal Highway Administration.<br><br>As a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Federal Highway Administration handles all the components of our highway system. This covers construction, designing highways, and maintaining the current ones. Also under this umbrella are the workers. The statistics prove how dangerous it is to be working near the highway. More than 20,000 people are injured every year, and over a hundred actually die. In order to reduce this, the FHWA requires that workers wear high-visibility clothing,specifically ANSI Class 2 or Class 3 safety vests. Brightly colored lime t-shirt help workers stay visible to both other workers and those going fast down the highway.<br><br>Working near the highway is extremely is hazardous, so safety vests are an absolute must for workers. Other professionals whose jobs bring them close to traffic also must wear safety vests. For example, EMTs, policemen and women, and others have to wear the vests. For increased safety, there is a huge selection of tools available online, such as lighted traffic cones, reflective rain gear, and hard hats.<br><br>The FHWA has a very long history. It's undergone many changes as highways became more and more of an important component of life in the US. The FHWA we know today was officially established in 1966, but it had many early prototypes. The first ever was the Office of Road Inquiry, established in 1893. Later, in 1905, it got its name changed to the Office of Public Roads and was a part of the Department of Agriculture. A decade later, it once again was changed to the Bureau of Public Roads, and in 1939,it became the Public Roads Administration. In 1949, it became the Bureau of Public Roads again, finally becoming the Federal Highway Administration in 1966.<br><br>The FHWA is involved in much more than simply constructing highways. They also care about the environment, enhancing highway technology, and enforcing the quality of safety for workers and drivers. Visiting their website will show just how many projects they are currently undertaking. For example, there's one on increasing safety at toll plazas. There's another for placing and constructing roads in the best spots to increase efficiency of gas and delivery of commodities. Another is working on reducing congestion and helping adjust to the growing population. They are also working on building better roads and bridges in Indian reservations, as well as safety programs for motorcyclists.<br><br>Americans are always traveling and using the highways to get from home to work, to the grocery store, or to a friend's or family member's house. It's the FHWA that makes all this travel possible. So many injuries and fatalities occur on the road every year,both for those working and driving, and the FHWA is adopting programs to help reduce the numbers. Things like requiring construction workers to wear the right safety green t-shirts or <a href="http://www.viewbritesafetyproducts.com/Safety-T-Shirt-Lime-p/tsh1901p-p.htm" target='_blank'>lime tshirts</a>, is just one of the ways they are helping out.

Are Playgrounds Too Safe [FOX 7-23-2011]

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Saturday July 23 2011 10:38 pm

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